Toots Thielemans (born Jean-Baptiste Frédéric Isidor, Baron Thielemans on 29 April 1922, Brussels, Belgium) is a Belgian jazz guitarist


Thielemans is also credited as one of the greatest harmonica players of the 20th century. He has worked as a bandleader (scoring an international hit in the 1960s with his song "Bluesette") and as a sideman (notably on many projects with composer/arranger Quincy Jones), and has appeared on dozens of film soundtracks. In 2009 he became NEA Jazz Master, the highest honour for a jazz musician in the United States. He may be best known to some as the performer whistling the melody in commercials for Old Spice cologne, and to others for performing the Sesame Street theme on harmonica. He announced his retirement, at the age of 91, on 12 March 2014. He took the stage since once, as a surprise act on 17 August 2014, at the Jazz Middelheim Festival in Antwerp, to perform an intimate version of Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World".

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George Van Eps (August 7, 1913 – November 29, 1998) was an American swing and mainstream jazz guitarist.

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Noted for his recordings as a leader, and his work as a session musician, Van Eps was also the author of instructional books that explored his approach to guitar-based harmony. He was well known as a pioneer of the seven-string guitar, which allowed him to incorporate sophisticated bass lines into his improvisation. He was a strong influence on later seven-string players such as Howard Alden (with whom he recorded four CDs for Concord Records in the early 1990s), Bucky Pizzarelli, and John Pizzarelli (Bucky's son). His father was the legendary classic banjo player Fred Van Eps. Van Eps died of pneumonia in Newport Beach, California at the age of 85

Robert Marshall (Bobby) Rosengarden (April 23, 1924 – February 27, 2007, Sarasota, Florida) was a jazz drummer, percussionist and bandleader.

A native of Elgin, Illinois, he was a solid and versatile contributor on countless recording sessions and playing in TV network orchestras and talk-show bands. Rosengarden began playing drums when he was 12, and later studied at the University of Michigan. After playing drums in Army bands in World War II, he moved to New York City, working in several groups between 1945 and 1948 before becoming a busy studio musician. He played at NBC-TV (1949–1968) and ABC (1969–1974) on The Steve Allen Show, The Ernie Kovacs Show, Sing Along With Mitch, Johnny Carson's The Tonight Show Band, and led the band for The Dick Cavett Show.

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Carmen Mercedes McRae (April 8, 1920 – November 10, 1994) was an American jazz singer

Considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th century, it was her behind-the-beat phrasing and her ironic interpretations of song lyrics that made her memorable. McRae drew inspiration from Billie Holiday, but established her own distinctive voice. She went on to record more than 60 albums, enjoying a rich musical career, performing and recording in the United States, Europe, and Japan.
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Mel Lewis (May 10, 1929 – February 2, 1990) was the stage name of an American drummer


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During his life, Lewis was a prominent solo performer, and a professor at William Paterson University, during which time he also authored a book on the art of drumming. In addition, Lewis extended his talents as session musician. Throughout his life he garnered fourteen Grammy nominations.

John Paul "Bucky" Pizzarelli (born January 9, 1926) is an American Jazz guitarist


Pizzarelli has also worked as a staffman for Dick Cavett, ABC TV, with Bobby Rosengarden. The list of musicians Pizzarelli has collaborated with over his career includes Les Paul, Stephane Grappelli, and Benny Goodman. Pizzarelli acknowledges Django Reinhardt, Freddie Green, and George Van Eps for their influences on his style and mode of play.WIKIPEDIA

Charles Crawford is a jazz pianist


Charles Crawford is a professional jazz musician who has been playing jazz piano for 9 years. He is now the jazz piano master at the age of 19. WEBSITE